Aizmirsu paroli

Mans e-pasts
 

DocuBox HD

Dokumentāls kanāls, kur tiek piedāvātas filmas, seriāli un programmas par savvaļas dabu, zinātni, cilvēci un pasaules kultūru

  • 01:20

    New Frontier (New Frontier)

    New Frontier (New Frontier)

    New Frontier

    The Moon, our closest celestial companion. Our indispensible dance partner through the cosmos. Lighting our night sky and gently tugging at our shores. Few have walked on her surface, though her allure remains strong, once again we are glancing her way with renewed interest and with a view to return very soon.

  • 01:45

    The Rescue Dogs Of Lake Garda (The Rescue Dogs Of Lake Garda)

    The Rescue Dogs Of Lake Garda (The Rescue Dogs Of Lake Garda)

    The Rescue Dogs Of Lake Garda

    17 year old Ester and her dog Mia have big plans: saving lives at Lake Garda. In the north of Italy swimming rescue dogs are on duty at several lakes and the Mediterranean Sea. After traffic accidents, drowning is worldwide the second most common cause of death by accident. But a rescue is always difficult as the rescuer itself can be in danger. Like Mia, the Italian rescue dogs are mostly Newfoundland's- dogs who love the water and with a weight of at least 66 pounds (30 Kilo?), are able to pull people out of the water. For 3 years the dog- owners and their animals are trained to save lives. But the biggest challenge for Ester waits at the end: a jump out of a helicopter.

  • 02:40

    The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter (The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter)

    The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter (The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter)

    The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter

    On the North-Western tip of Greenland, fathers give their boys small dog sledges as soon as they can walk. The toy is meant to teach them hunting, a survival skill for Polar Inuits. Increasingly fewer boys, however, want to become hunters. 12-year-old Qaaqqukannguaq is an exception. During the spring holidays, he is going to accompany his father on a hunting trip for the first time. For several days, they will cross the ice desert on dog sledges, covering the 70 km from Savissivik, their tiny community, to Cape York.

  • 03:35

    On the Yeti Trail (On the Yeti Trail)

    On the Yeti Trail (On the Yeti Trail)

    On the Yeti Trail

    Does the Yeti really exist? For the first time in over a century, the sometimes far-fetched Yeti legends and personal accounts have become the subject of state-of-the-art scientific studies. Several teams throughout the world, in Denmark, England, the US and Russia are carrying out a merciless competition to be the first to publish the revolutionary results – proof that another hominid, with very ancient roots, shares our existence. Our film sets out to meet the teams involved in this strange race across the world, and features laboratories, hair analysis, footprints and DNA as well as the search for samples in Indonesia and in Canadian nature reserves. A fascinating and thorough film, featuring, amongst others, French Collège de France paleoanthropologist Pascal Picq.

  • 04:30

    Trouble in Lemur Land (Trouble in Lemur Land)

    Trouble in Lemur Land (Trouble in Lemur Land)

    Trouble in Lemur Land

    High up in the mountains of north-eastern Madagascar lives one of the world's most critically endangered primates. There are less than a thousand Silky Sifakas alive today and this area of remote rainforest, known as Marojejy–Anjanaharibe-Sud, is their only home.In the past, the rugged terrain here kept the Silkies relatively safe but things are now changing at an alarming pace. This magical place is under serious threat from illegal logging operations as international demand for highly sought-after rosewood and ebony increases. Unscrupulous logging gangs are encroaching on the Silkies' last remaining habitat."Trouble in Lemur Land" follows two men, an American primatologist and a Malagasy conservationist, on their quest to protect this rare species, at the same time providing a rare glimpse into the life of this extraordinarily beautiful and graceful animal.The film centres around the arrival of two babies in the group – a glimmer of hope in an otherwise desperate situation. Lemur reproduction rates are slow and Silkies only mate one day in the year, so it is a very special moment when primatologist Erik Patel sees the newborns for the first time. He has a permanent camp on the outskirts of their last remaining territory and we are given a rare glimpse into this intimate, close-knit group as the babies develop in the sanctuary of the forest canopy.Meanwhile, taking advantage of long-term political instability, the loggers are steadily extracting Madagascar's rosewood for export to China. Although they are well armed and highly motivated, conservationist Desire Rabary is not afraid to confront them, regardless of the risks. He heads up a network of local people who play a vital role in the survival of the forest and its lemurs. Over the past five years, he has worked hard to actively expose the loggers' illegal trail of destruction but, as this film reveals, the heart of the problem starts on his own doorstep.This 50-minute HD film brings the forest to life, with stunning images of many of its other species, including the striking helmet vanga bird, white-fronted brown lemur, red-bellied lemur, green tree frogs, panther chameleons and the elusive fossa. This treasure trove of endemic Madagascan wildlife is a timely reminder of what we stand to lose if the environmental issues so critical to their survival are not urgently addressed.

  • 05:20

    Argan Oil: The White Gold Of Morocco (Argan Oil: The White Gold Of Morocco)

    Argan Oil: The White Gold Of Morocco (Argan Oil: The White Gold Of Morocco)

    Argan Oil: The White Gold Of Morocco

    This report follows the process of making Argan oil, beginning with the harvest and ending with the cooperatives working for the international market. Made from the nuts of the Argan tree, which grows almost exclusively in the Essaouira region of Morocco, Argan oil has become one of the latest miracle ingredients of the beauty industry in Europe. Publicity is created around the fact that this oil is made by Berber women. But who are they? How do they live? And how hard is their work? We accompany these women in their daily lives and take part in their traditions.

  • 06:15

    Stolen Treasures (Stolen Treasures)

    Stolen Treasures (Stolen Treasures)

    Stolen Treasures

    It's the biggest museum in the world…the museum of artworks stolen over the centuries and never rediscovered. These works haunt the nightmares of their owners, and occupy the days of hundreds of police officers across the world, as well as those of a handful of private agencies; no country or museum of importance can claim to have been spared.\nAccording to Interpol, art theft is the fourth largest criminal trade, after the drug trade, the weapons trade and money laundering. How could it be otherwise, when the soaring price of art propels the value of some paintings into the tens of millions of Euros?\nThis world appears to be full of mysteries. Crime syndicates rub shoulders with petty criminals and the police care more about recovering the items than they do about arresting the perpetrators.

  • 06:55

    European Islands (European Islands)

    European Islands (European Islands)

    European Islands

    The European islands are renowned primarily for their hotel resorts. However, we will show you a completely different face of theirs: forests, beaches, coves, mountains, valleys and rivers. Perhaps you will find places that will take your breath away. Why just lie on the beach when there is so much to see? Put on some good hiking shoes, pull your shoelaces tight, and get to know the entire island like the back of your hand.

  • 07:30

    European Islands (European Islands)

    European Islands (European Islands)

    European Islands

    The European islands are renowned primarily for their hotel resorts. However, we will show you a completely different face of theirs: forests, beaches, coves, mountains, valleys and rivers. Perhaps you will find places that will take your breath away. Why just lie on the beach when there is so much to see? Put on some good hiking shoes, pull your shoelaces tight, and get to know the entire island like the back of your hand.

  • 08:05

    Of Boats And Men (Of Boats And Men)

    Of Boats And Men (Of Boats And Men)

    Of Boats And Men

    Travelling by boat bears a priceless sense of Freedom and offers endless new vistas to all passengers. Across waterways around the world Boats are an essential tool of daily life whether they carry goods, serve as utilities or services in remote areas.

  • 09:00

    Wild Ones (Wild Ones)

    Wild Ones (Wild Ones)

    Wild Ones

    The most venomous snake on land. The deserted heart of the Australian outback, where people seldom venture, is the hot, baked home of the most venomous land snake in the world – the inland taipan, a two meter long snake with enough venom in one bite to kill a quarter of a million mice. The rare envenomating lizard. Venom is not the exclusive domain of snakes and spiders. In the deserts of the south-west United States and the north west of Mexico lives the striking and venomous Gila Monster – the largest land lizard in North America. Blue ringed octopus. In the shallow waters of the Pacific Ocean is an animal the size of a golf ball that carries with it not one, but two types of venom. One is used on its main prey of crabs and is relatively harmless to humans, the other is used in defense and can kill an adult human in minutes. The tiny toxin wielding Red-backed spider. In secluded outhouses, under fences and letterboxes, under barbeques and amongst garden litter are the messy webs that hold the killing fields and the hundreds of offspring of a very deadly female. Tucked in the corner of her web the scarlet stripe of the red-back spider advertises her lethal capabilities. The ferocious Sydney funnel web. In contrast to the timid red-back spider, the fearsome Sydney Funnel-Web is more inclined to stand its ground than to run. And in contrast to the red back, it is the male funnel-web that is the more dangerous of the two sexes. Funnel-webs can be extremely aggressive and are armed with downward pointing fangs that are strong enough to pierce fingernails as they deliver their highly toxic venom – which has the deadliest venom?

  • 09:30

    Wild Ones (Wild Ones)

    Wild Ones (Wild Ones)

    Wild Ones

    Wildebeest and Zebra - Africa's most famous drifters. Hundreds of thousands of zebra live together in the Serengeti. Their distinctive eye-catching stripes are as unique as fingerprints and even within the largest of gatherings no two zebra will be found with exactly the same stripes. Turtles that make epic journeys to reproduce. The most abundant sea turtle in the world, Olive Ridleys' have extraordinary nesting habits. These small turtles migrate massive distances between their oceanic feeding grounds and the shores that draw them back to mate, and then to nest. Sooty Tern - Sea birds that don't come to land for years. Like the turtle, once it has left land for the first time, a young Sooty Tern may not go back for years, spending all its time in the ocean skies until it is time for it to breed. Soaring on outstretched wings, these elegant seabirds feed almost entirely on the fish driven to the surface by the hunters below. Australian Pelicans - Water birds that follow ephemeral rivers. Pelicans – these quirky, comical, big billed birds are usually thought of as spending all their time around coasts and harbors. They are widespread in Australia's lakes, rivers, billabongs and estuaries – or other waterway with enough food for their fish-loving lifestyle. The whales and whale sharks that roam the great oceans. Some of the greatest migratory animals on earth are those that live in its waters and traverse its great oceans. From baleen whales that travel from the nutrient rich polar waters and the whale sharks whose migrations we barely understand.

  • 10:00

    Tigerfish: Africa's Piranha (Tigerfish: Africa's Piranha)

    Tigerfish: Africa's Piranha (Tigerfish: Africa's Piranha)

    Tigerfish: Africa's Piranha

    Legends say they are man-eaters, that even crocodiles fear them. Some say they're the ghosts of the river, "demon fish" that bring bad luck. Few people have ever been lucky enough to see one in the flesh and for angling legend Andy Coetzee, coming face to face with a Goliath Tigerfish is a lifelong dream. He will do almost anything to feed his obsession and unravel the mystery behind Africa's Piranha! Andy has travelled the world in search of the most elusive fish on the planet. He's obstinate, passionate and determined and when it comes to fishing, he's been there and done it all. But one big fish still eludes him – the Goliath Tigerfish! Catching one of these legendary monsters will be the apex of his fishing career. But it's easier said than done. The Tigerfish is rated by sport anglers as the hardest fish in the world to catch. Andy will need his lifetime of experience to succeed on this mission. And he's ready to risk his life to fulfil his dream. His journey starts in the Okavango Delta where he'll brave crocodile infested waters to study Tigerfish underwater. Only a handful of people have ever dived these channels but it's one of a few Tigerfish hotspots on the planet where he can track them down in clear waters. Tigerfish have carved out their niche in some of the most inaccessible habitats on the planet and as a result very little is known about these cousins of the Piranha. Many would say that finding this elusive fish in the deepest river on the planet is almost a mission impossible, but Andy will stop at nothing to reach his goal. \n\n\nTraveling into the depths of the Congo is like venturing into a lost world. It's no coincidence that it's referred to as the "Heart of Darkness" – this is the land of plagues and river pirates and Andy will have to brave them all to meet his nemesis. Even if he hooks one, there's no guarantee he'll be able to land it. Goliath's are almost impossible to catch – their bony jaws and inch long teeth are impervious to most fishing tackle\n\nAndy's epic quest plunges him into the depths of the Tigerfishes secret realm. His expertise as an angler is taunted and challenged at every cast, but every fresh failure adds to his awe and respect of these legendary monster fish.

  • 10:55

    The Donkey Island (The Donkey Island)

    The Donkey Island (The Donkey Island)

    With 6,000 donkeys for 24,000 inhabitants, the Island of Lamu off the coast of Kenya certainly holds the world record. This situation is due to its narrow streets, along which vehicles cannot pass. There are only 2 cars on the island, and one of those belongs to the refuge that takes care of the donkeys. Donkeys are part of the landscape, and are used for travelling as well as beasts of burden. There is also a well-known donkey race that takes place in the region once a year! Shee Famao, a young teenager, has already won the race twice and hopes to win it again. 360° - GEO paid him a visit on his native island.

  • 11:50

    The New Nomadic People Of Kyrgyzstan (The New Nomadic People Of Kyrgyzstan)

    The New Nomadic People Of Kyrgyzstan (The New Nomadic People Of Kyrgyzstan)

    360° GEO - Report accompanies the Kyrgyzstani nomad family and their 600 animals as they trek through gorges and rapid mountain springs. 40-year-old Kyrgyzstani Bachit makes his living by pasture farming. He is an astute shepherd and realized long ago that major changes were taking place in his homeland, the Tien Chan Mountains, on the Chinese border: the high mountain peaks - some of them at an altitude of 7,000 metres - are thawing rapidly. This is an effect of global warming, with as yet unknown global consequences. Bachit has adapted to the new situation: fince several years now, he has been leading his huge flock anually from the village to a 3,000-meter altitude summer pasture - a risky adventure.

  • 12:45

    Gannets - The Wrong Side of the Run (Gannets - The Wrong Side of the Run)

    Gannets - The Wrong Side of the Run (Gannets - The Wrong Side of the Run)

    Gannets - The Wrong Side of the Run

    At the tip of Africa two oceans collide, creating one of the most productive eco-systems on the planet. Here, one of the largest shoals of fish known to man form the basis of two food chains that split and extend for 100's of miles. After the sardines part at Cape Agulhas, each shoal passes it's own critical point. On the west coast of Africa, this is Malgas Island, a traditionally energetic hub of life dominated by the presence of the supreme sardine hunter, the Cape gannet. On the opposing coast, the shoals pass Bird Island, the eastern equivalent of Malgas. Circumstances on the two bird colonies are very different; on the west we see dwindling numbers of sardine, whilst on the east, Bird Island is the inverse. While the Malgas Gannets battle to raise chicks amid skirmishes by Kelp gulls and hungry seals, the Bird island gannets move to intercept huge volumes of sardines. What transpires is one of the greatest marine feeding events on the planet, and in these two parallel scenarios, we see how one environment is mutating under pressure, while the other experiences a bumper season. Will the gannets of Malgas island adapt to their changing world? Can the disappearing sardine stock survive, and in turn support the wide array of marine predators that rely heavily on it. The breath-taking landscape, action and predation sequences are strengthened by solid natural history behaviour with an environmental comment.

  • 13:40

    Floods (Floods)

    Floods (Floods)

    Floods

    "Floods" is a film dedicated to the memory of those victims of the great floods like those of New York, Bangkok and Xynthia.\n\nThis film takes us from New York to Tokyo and Bangkok, visiting Shanghai, the Netherlands and Germany on the way. Throughout the world, oceanographers, coastal engineers, geologists, economists, architects and insurance companies cooperate to understand, anticipate and create a strategy of sustainable protection systems. The relationship between man, his cities and its environment is entirely being redefined. A global and multidisciplinary approach is needed to push boundaries and convince political authorities to act now, to save entire regions from flood threat.

  • 14:30

    St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic (St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic)

    St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic (St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic)

    360°GEO - Report sets foot on the isolated island of St Helena and documents what life is like in the midst of the South Atlantic.Standing solitarily far out in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean is the British Overseas Territory of St. Helena. Island do not get much more remote than this. It is situated 2,000 kilometers from the African coast and 3,000 kilometers from the South American Coast. You can see why it was chosen as a place of exile for the French emperor Napoleon.It is all but impossible to escape from St. Helena. Even today, the only connection to the outside world is by ship, given that the island has no airport. About 4,000 people or "Saints" as they refer to themselves, brave the solitude and live on the island.

  • 15:25

    Arctic: The Route Of the Nuclear-powered Icebreakers (Arctic: The Route Of the Nuclear-powered Icebreakers)

    Arctic: The Route Of the Nuclear-powered Icebreakers (Arctic: The Route Of the Nuclear-powered Icebreakers)

    Arctic: The Route Of the Nuclear-powered Icebreakers

    This report accompanies a polar cargo ship through the Arctic Sea and provides a rare insight into the interior of the Russian nuclear-powered icebreaker float. Along the north coast of Russia, a land of climatic extremes, lies one of the most difficult to navigate straits in the world. The Northern Sea route is a 6,000 kilometer shipping lane through the Polar Sea.

  • 16:20

    Organic Panic (Organic Panic)

    Organic Panic (Organic Panic)

    Organic Panic

    In episode 2 we explore the more "nourishing" side of personal products, examining moisturizers, cleansers and toothpaste. Lawyer Holly Rasky worries that her favourite products are going to make her sick. Author and EcoHolic activist Adria Vasil takes her on a pharmacy tour and explains how Canada's lax regulations allow manufacturers to include potentially toxic chemicals in our most intimate products, chemicals that are banned in the rest of the world. Reluctant to give up her favourite toothpaste, Holly speaks with former health minister Darren Praznik who assures her that the government does everything it can to protect her and that industry has strong incentives to keep her safe. Health Canada chimes in with facts and figures to show they are Canadians best defense against dangerous products.

  • 16:40

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force

    A snapshot of Seasons, how they work together and keep the globe in balance. Droughts are explored in terms of how we can predict them, proof our lives from them and collect data because of them. Hurricanes are explained, their power revealed and the measures that are used to help us survive their impact. Thunderstorms have a few stages of development that roll out in a particular order.

  • 17:10

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force

    How are Rainbows formed and what's their science? We look at the largest Hail ever recorded and explain why it comes in so many shapes and sizes. Global Warming is a big issue and topic, and we give a nutshell insight to its meaning and impact on many levels. Forecasting is key and crucial to living with nature and its weather, as it involves precision technologies and expertise. Typhoon Halyan is an example of one of the most devastating storms in recent history and its story illustrates the power and destruction that Typhoons can cause.

  • 17:45

    Mindworks (Mindworks)

    Mindworks (Mindworks)

    Mindworks

    Understanding how we think and see by playing games with our brains. This factual entertainment series explores the way we see and interpret the world around us with engaging tests, activities, demonstrations and explanations. In each episode we experience visual and audio illusions, sensory puzzles and brain tricks from the worlds of art, science, nature and psychology and learn why they baffle our senses.

  • 18:15

    Mindworks (Mindworks)

    Mindworks (Mindworks)

    Mindworks

    Understanding how we think and see by playing games with our brains. This factual entertainment series explores the way we see and interpret the world around us with engaging tests, activities, demonstrations and explanations. In each episode we experience visual and audio illusions, sensory puzzles and brain tricks from the worlds of art, science, nature and psychology and learn why they baffle our senses.

  • 18:45

    A Year in the Wild (A Year in the Wild)

    A Year in the Wild (A Year in the Wild)

    A Year in the Wild

    A resident baboon on one of the ranches requires some human help to extract a snare. The splinters pack run into a coalition of cheetahs. Jess visits the new-born Splinters pups. Pungwe are on the hunt for big game as they take on formidable buffalo. The Splinters once again demonstrate their extraordinary hunting tactics.

  • 19:30

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Wonder

    Seg 1 Carrion flowers. Carrion flowers are the unorthodox perception of flowers for they are rare, big, and very unpleasant. Other terms are stink flowers and corpse flowers. The biggest flower in the world, rafflesia arnoldii, is a carrion flower. These flowers are difficult to find and reproduce and could breed through cross-pollination by attracting flies and dung beetles. Seg 2 Aposematism. Aposematism is a form of signalling that enables protection for both preys and predators by giving signs of poison and danger through showing off the bright colors and patterns on their epidermal layers that become associated with inedibility. Some species have developed mimicry based on aposematism in order to avail the protection aposematic colors give. Seg 3 Cuckoo Misdirection. Cuckoo misdirection demonstrates the mimicking abilities of a female cuckoo in order to find host nests to hatch her eggs. The female mimics a cry of a predator bird in order to frighten the hosts, leaving them vulnerable, thus the cuckoo can seize the chance to drop her egg on a host nest. Seg 4 Pheromones. Animal pheromones are the chemicals secreted and released by different species to communicate with other organisms. There are various types serving different purposes, ranging from reproduction, to trailing, to alarms. Some pheromones are also specific to one species of animals. Seg 5 Deimatic Behavior. Deimatic behavior is another type of defensive behavior in animals that also involves mimicry. It's the opposite of aposematism because while aposematism works by blatantly showing or signalling its danger or unpalatability, deimatic behavior relies on the element of surprise to startle predators in\norder for species to flee to safety.

  • 20:05

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Wonder

    Seg 1 Saccadic Eye Masking. Saccadic eye movements are characterized as the fast movement of eyes when perceiving motion. These are so fast that they are blurred. To compensate for the blurriness, our brains mask these blurred visions to help us see a completed albeit masked version of sight. Seg 2 Plant Movement. While plants do not exhibit movement for locomotion or moving from place to place, they still exhibit\nmovement in response to different stimuli. These movements are plant adaptations for food production, plant reproduction and survival. Seg 3 The Language of Color. Language plays a major role in how people from different parts of the world perceive color. The fact that some languages completely lack terms for some colors that other languages have come to know offers insight on how much influence it has on the way people see colors. Seg 4 Color Blindness. Color blindness is the condition that makes people not able to properly see and perceive colors. Color blindness is the result of damaged or underdeveloped rods and cones. these are the light sensitive cells that can be found in the part of our eyes known as the retina which are responsible for seeing colors. Color blindness can either be genetic or caused by sustained damage to the retina over time. Seg 5 Perspective Illusion. This is a technique used in illustrations to render scenes and objects in 3 dimensions with depth and foreshortening. The technique was pioneered by Italian painters during the renaissance period. It involves drawing objects with reference to points measured from a constant line of sight.

  • 20:35

    The Tech Effect (The Tech Effect)

    The Tech Effect (The Tech Effect)

    The Tech Effect

    In this episode we examine advances in aviation that include flying cars being developed by Slovakian and Japanese companies. Ride share companies are also considering aerial options, with Uber among those working on autonomous urban aircraft that will fly over congested roads to landing points in the centre of cities. As the skies of the future will be teeming with flying vehicles, suitable air traffic management is essential. We look at new systems to connect autonomous aircraft with each other and an overarching traffic control. Finally, we explore a concept airliner of the future. Sustainable and flexible, it incorporates holograms and neural networks to provide a more engaging and relaxing flight.

  • 21:00

    The Tech Effect (The Tech Effect)

    The Tech Effect (The Tech Effect)

    The Tech Effect

    In this episode we travel on a space tourist test flight that flies high above the Earth. It's just one of the options available for wealthy thrill-seekers looking to defy gravity on a trip above our atmosphere. We also look at the latest spacesuits designed by NASA for extra-vehicular activity, or floating in space. Finally, we get an update on the Artemis project, the plan to send men and women to the moon this decade. Artemis requires cooperation between all the major space agencies to build a huge new space station called Gateway, that will also be the launch pad for a crewed mission to Mars this century.

  • 21:25

    Street Football In My Country (Street Football In My Country)

    Street Football In My Country (Street Football In My Country)

    Street Football is a worldwide phenomenon that can be played by anyone, no matter their age, their gender or where they come from. It can be played anywhere, no need for a stadium, white lines, green grasses or even shoes ! In each episode of these series we take you to an emerging country where Football has become a way of helping children and bringing hope by life changing their habits. Discover the attaching portraits of these children that might one day become some of the greatest players in the world just like before them C. Ronaldo, Messi, Neymar and so many others.

  • 21:55

    Street Football In My Country (Street Football In My Country)

    Street Football In My Country (Street Football In My Country)

    Street Football is a worldwide phenomenon that can be played by anyone, no matter their age, their gender or where they come from. It can be played anywhere, no need for a stadium, white lines, green grasses or even shoes ! In each episode of these series we take you to an emerging country where Football has become a way of helping children and bringing hope by life changing their habits. Discover the attaching portraits of these children that might one day become some of the greatest players in the world just like before them C. Ronaldo, Messi, Neymar and so many others.

  • 22:20

    Mindworks (Mindworks)

    Mindworks (Mindworks)

    Mindworks

    Understanding how we think and see by playing games with our brains. This factual entertainment series explores the way we see and interpret the world around us with engaging tests, activities, demonstrations and explanations. In each episode we experience visual and audio illusions, sensory puzzles and brain tricks from the worlds of art, science, nature and psychology and learn why they baffle our senses.

  • 22:45

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science

    Mankind has been flying for over a century. As early as the 1500s Leonardo da Vinci tried to build a flying machine. Drawing inspiration from birds he gave it wings. Unfortunately, his "Ornithopter" didn't work, and indeed, the airplanes of today do not have flapping wings! We also tried it with balloons. Huge 245-metre long airships that needed the guts of between 80,000 to 200,000 cows! But, it was the kite that became the forerunner of the flying machine. A kite made by the now famous Wright brothers. The two brothers were bicycle repairmen, which convinced them that a flying machine could be highly unstable and yet controllable, such as with bicycles. They built their kites as strong as their bicycle frames and used bicycle parts to test their workings. The early Wright planes could manage no more than 65 km/h. Nowadays, a commercial plane can top 800 km/h. What is it that make our current planes fly 12 times faster? Well, one British Royal Air pilot, Frank Whittle, remembered his school experiments with the 'Aeolipile', a piece of ancient Greek engineering. This pilot argued that we could fly faster – if we'd fly higher - because there is less air resistance at high altitudes. The future of aviation has lead to Airbus's A380, the largest passenger plane in the world as well as the scramjet built by NASA. So what will be the next quirky discovery for flight?

  • 23:10

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science

    Cooling is more than a luxury. Nowadays it is a necessity. Without refrigerated shipping and stocking, fresh food wouldn't reach our supermarket so easily. Can you imagine living without it? Before the invention of the refrigerator, icehouses were used to provide cool storage for most of the year. To cool our food and beverages, blocks of ice were simply cut out of frozen lakes and shipped to far and beyond. The so-called "ice-industry" came to its end when, in the late 1900s, our waters became too polluted to serve as a cool preserving agent. Air-conditioning, on the other hand, was actually invented to control the humidity that was ruining the paper of printing offices, rather than the technology being used to cool you off. The quirky part is, you can't create cold; you can only "move" temperature form one place to another. The first one to find a technology that cooled the inside of a box - the forefather of the refrigerator - was a medical doctor. In fact, he thought he was building a machine to cure malaria. And yet it took over a century after that, before people started using refrigerators, because refrigerators were thought to be dangerous. And they had a point! For a few decades, the refrigerator was something of a killer machine (literally) as they omitted toxic gases that poisoned people… Even Einstein got worried and developed a cooling-machine. And when refrigerators stopped killing people, scientists discovered that refrigerants were harming the environment. All sorts of chemicals have passed through our refrigerator coils, to be discarded… but perhaps we have a new solution: cooling with the vibrations of sound. That does sound cool.

  • 23:35

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration (Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration (Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration

    Zenith – Advances in Space Exploration reveals these latest developments and the implications they hold for all of us.

  • 00:00

    The Last Orangutans Of Sumatra (The Last Orangutans Of Sumatra)

    The Last Orangutans Of Sumatra (The Last Orangutans Of Sumatra)

    The Last Orangutans Of Sumatra

    Today there are only 6000 Orang-Utans living in Sumatra. According to pessimistic evaluations the chances of this threatened species to survive seem rather limited. The main reason for their extinction is that their natural habitat is being destroyed for the more profitable cultivation of palm oil plantations. By today already 70 % of the Sumatran Island is already covered by palm oil trees. In addition most of the local population sees them more as an object of entertainment rather than a national heritage which is worth being protected. Since that common attitude in society is even changing it could still come too late for those anthropoid apes. Ian Singleton who moved here from England is dedicating his life to the care of these apes. Since 20 years, he is working to facilitate a refuge for the last ones of their kind so they could live again untroubled in Nature and maybe even decrease their population

  • 00:55

    New Frontier (New Frontier)

    New Frontier (New Frontier)

    New Frontier

    They orbit between us and our Star, the inner worlds; hidden within the sun's glare often only visible at sunrise or sunset. Venus the first and brightest star in the evening sky, and Mercury fleeting across the solar disk. They are half of our solar system's terrestrial planets yet we know so little. As we begin to take a closer look at our companions they are posing more questions than answers.

  • 01:20

    New Frontier (New Frontier)

    New Frontier (New Frontier)

    New Frontier

    From the beginnings of our Solar System four and half billion years ago there remains tantalizing clues to its evolution; remnent debris: asteroids and comets. They vary in size from grains of dust to mountain sides, footballs to planetoids. They were the building blocks of the planets and perhaps carry the origins of life itself. Now within our grasp these rocks of ice and dust are ready to give up their secrets.