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Dokumentāls kanāls, kur tiek piedāvātas filmas, seriāli un programmas par savvaļas dabu, zinātni, cilvēci un pasaules kultūru

  • 23:55

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration (Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration (Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)

    Zenith – Advances in Space Exploration reveals these latest developments and the implications they hold for all of us.

  • 00:25

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration (Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)

    Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration (Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)

    Zenith – Advances in Space Exploration reveals these latest developments and the implications they hold for all of us.

  • 01:00

    Alexander the Great, the Macedonian (Alexander the Great, the Macedonian)

    Alexander the Great, the Macedonian (Alexander the Great, the Macedonian)

    A close look at Alexander the Great - from Macedonia to India.\nAlexander the Great has always enjoyed a unique status in history. To the Greeks and Romans, he was a hero, to the Arabs, he was a prophet, to Westerners, he is a myth. Alexander the Great spread Greek civilisation single-handedly throughout the ancient world, as far as the borders of India, by relentlessly pursuing his sworn enemy Darius the Great, King of Persia. But what remains today of the "real" Alexander? Of his life and environment? Through the many depictions of the hero and the archaeological traces of his triumphant conquest, this film portrays the legendary figure, who has always been, and continues to be, a great source of inspiration, even for artists of today.

  • 01:55

    Mind In Motion (Mind In Motion)

    Mind In Motion (Mind In Motion)

    Mind In Motion

    Our exploration will lead us into the depths of the brain and to the very sources of consciousness, for a fascinating glimpse into the process of thought. How can we decide whether a person in a coma is likely to return to consciousness? How can a person see with the tongue? Why do amputees experience phantom sensations in missing limbs? What do we have in common with the fruit fly? What are the effects of meditation on the brain? Scientific answers to these questions and others are now within our reach, thanks to stunning new research in the neurosciences. It focuses on the brain, our mental mechanisms, the connection between body and mind. Why we need to represent ourselves and others consciously in order to survive? In our quest for answers, we have met some remarkable scientists - high-ranking pioneers who are innovative yet modest. They share their discoveries and questions with us while stressing that it is vitally importance for our society to try and understand why we have conscious brains. The story of their search, across North America and Europe, will be vividly told through evocative visuals and original imagery from new brain exploration technology.

  • 02:50

    Roll on Cinema (Roll on Cinema)

    Roll on Cinema (Roll on Cinema)

    Roll on Cinema

    This film endeavours to show how the invention of cinema was in no way inevitable, and how it may well have been a mere accident. To pinpoint the start, it all began in the heart of Paris, in the depths of darkened room, on 28 March 1798, when Etienne-Gaspard Robertson gave one of his first screenings of his "Fantasmagoria" - making ghosts and spectres dance. But how did we move from perfecting the magic lantern to the cinematography of the Lumière brothers? The invention was born throughout the 19th century, out of the unpredictable crossing of two parallel research paths - that of philosophical toys and the photography of movement. Originally-named optical devices - such as the kinesigraph, the zoetrope, the praxinoscope and the phenakistoscope, without forgetting the photographic revolver or gun - associated the realm of toys with the realm of thought, reflecting both a fascination for the magical effects produced by animation and speed, and a desire to understand human anatomy, and analyse the phenomenon of vision. All these pre-cinema optical devices literally stemmed from a desire for spectacle and the will to acquire knowledge. Robertson, Reynaud, Plateau, Muybridge and Marey spearheaded the adventure. Thanks to these brilliant inventors, we travel across the 19th century, ending in Paris in 1895 in the Salon Indien du Grand Café, where the first public movie screening took place.

  • 03:45

    St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic (St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic)

    St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic (St. Helena, Forgotten Island Of the Atlantic)

    360°GEO - Report sets foot on the isolated island of St Helena and documents what life is like in the midst of the South Atlantic.Standing solitarily far out in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean is the British Overseas Territory of St. Helena. Island do not get much more remote than this. It is situated 2,000 kilometers from the African coast and 3,000 kilometers from the South American Coast. You can see why it was chosen as a place of exile for the French emperor Napoleon.It is all but impossible to escape from St. Helena. Even today, the only connection to the outside world is by ship, given that the island has no airport. About 4,000 people or "Saints" as they refer to themselves, brave the solitude and live on the island.

  • 04:40

    Anatolia Land Of the Apricots (Anatolia Land Of the Apricots)

    Anatolia Land Of the Apricots (Anatolia Land Of the Apricots)

    Anatolia Land Of the Apricots

    Millions of golden yellow fruits dry out in the sun. They are called 'Gold of Mesopotamia', the juicy apricots of Anatolia. On the plantations at the shore of the Euphrates grow 95 % of all apricots processed worldwide. But the idyllic atmosphere is deceiving: behind this picturesque façade, seething conflicts erupt among the old patriarchs about more self-determination and, above all, the concerns over climate change and its effects on the harvest are hovering.

  • 05:35

    Bolivia Highway Of Death (Bolivia Highway Of Death)

    Bolivia Highway Of Death (Bolivia Highway Of Death)

    Bolivia Highway Of Death

    Bolivia is a country of contrasts: the Andes with peaks of 5,800 meters in the West and the Amazon basin in the East. In between: the Yungas region and the most dangerous roads in the world - the workplace of trucker Julio Gustavo and his old Volvo. Julio is in his early 40s and is a truck driver in Bolivia. Driving trucks is his passion, but he cannot get used to the traffic on the new freeways. He still prefers the famous dirt road, barely 3 meters large. Because of the elevated accident and death rate, it is still known today as the "Carretera de la Muerte" or "Highway of Death".

  • 06:30

    My Dubai (My Dubai)

    My Dubai (My Dubai)

    My Dubai

    Food & Gastronomy - Dubai's rich international dining scene, its food festival, Beach Canteen, the secret squirrel blogger, food tours of exotic restaurants, and genuine Emirati cuisine.

  • 07:00

    Let's All Go To the Sea (Let's All Go To the Sea)

    Let's All Go To the Sea (Let's All Go To the Sea)

    Let's All Go To the Sea

    Coastlines and seafronts are the gateways to the oceans, a source of many and varied natural resources. It's easy to understand why half of the world's population lives along or near the coast. Throughout history man has discovered and settled faraway places by first reaching land on the coasts and seafronts. And it's one explanation for the fascinating racial mix that is often found on coasts. The ten coastlines featured in the series brilliantly reflect the lifestyles and customs of the people that use them.

  • 07:45

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science

    Mankind has been flying for over a century. As early as the 1500s Leonardo da Vinci tried to build a flying machine. Drawing inspiration from birds he gave it wings. Unfortunately, his "Ornithopter" didn't work, and indeed, the airplanes of today do not have flapping wings! We also tried it with balloons. Huge 245-metre long airships that needed the guts of between 80,000 to 200,000 cows! But, it was the kite that became the forerunner of the flying machine. A kite made by the now famous Wright brothers. The two brothers were bicycle repairmen, which convinced them that a flying machine could be highly unstable and yet controllable, such as with bicycles. They built their kites as strong as their bicycle frames and used bicycle parts to test their workings. The early Wright planes could manage no more than 65 km/h. Nowadays, a commercial plane can top 800 km/h. What is it that make our current planes fly 12 times faster? Well, one British Royal Air pilot, Frank Whittle, remembered his school experiments with the 'Aeolipile', a piece of ancient Greek engineering. This pilot argued that we could fly faster – if we'd fly higher - because there is less air resistance at high altitudes. The future of aviation has lead to Airbus's A380, the largest passenger plane in the world as well as the scramjet built by NASA. So what will be the next quirky discovery for flight?

  • 08:15

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science (Quirky Science)

    Quirky Science

    Cooling is more than a luxury. Nowadays it is a necessity. Without refrigerated shipping and stocking, fresh food wouldn't reach our supermarket so easily. Can you imagine living without it? Before the invention of the refrigerator, icehouses were used to provide cool storage for most of the year. To cool our food and beverages, blocks of ice were simply cut out of frozen lakes and shipped to far and beyond. The so-called "ice-industry" came to its end when, in the late 1900s, our waters became too polluted to serve as a cool preserving agent. Air-conditioning, on the other hand, was actually invented to control the humidity that was ruining the paper of printing offices, rather than the technology being used to cool you off. The quirky part is, you can't create cold; you can only "move" temperature form one place to another. The first one to find a technology that cooled the inside of a box - the forefather of the refrigerator - was a medical doctor. In fact, he thought he was building a machine to cure malaria. And yet it took over a century after that, before people started using refrigerators, because refrigerators were thought to be dangerous. And they had a point! For a few decades, the refrigerator was something of a killer machine (literally) as they omitted toxic gases that poisoned people… Even Einstein got worried and developed a cooling-machine. And when refrigerators stopped killing people, scientists discovered that refrigerants were harming the environment. All sorts of chemicals have passed through our refrigerator coils, to be discarded… but perhaps we have a new solution: cooling with the vibrations of sound. That does sound cool.

  • 08:45

    Of Boats And Men (Of Boats And Men)

    Of Boats And Men (Of Boats And Men)

    Of Boats And Men

    Travelling by boat bears a priceless sense of Freedom and offers endless new vistas to all passengers. Across waterways around the world Boats are an essential tool of daily life whether they carry goods, serve as utilities or services in remote areas.

  • 09:45

    Versailles Furniture (Versailles Furniture)

    Versailles Furniture (Versailles Furniture)

    Versailles Furniture

    Via six masterpieces, the film reveals the beauty of the spirit of Versailles of the 17th and 18th centuries. A unique homage to the people that crafted it, the furniture reveals the personal tastes of its commissioners, and portrays something that has ceased to exist!\nThese unique items of furniture that once belonged to Louis 14th, Louis 15th, Marie-Antoinette and Louis 16th have fascinating stories to tell: the tortoise-shell chest-of-drawers with inlays of brass; an astronomical clock - a veritable miracle of science; the most emblematic example of French furniture art in the world - the King's Desk; and the exquisite items made for Marie-Antoinette - the queen's jewellery case and the wheat-sheaf furniture.

  • 10:40

    The Seawomen Of Japan (The Seawomen Of Japan)

    The Seawomen Of Japan (The Seawomen Of Japan)

    For centuries, in Japan, mollusc fishing has been a women business. 360° Geo - Report takes a plunge into the closed world of a group of "Ama".For centuries, diving for seafood in Japan has been "ladies work" and is done by "Ama", or "women of the sea". They carry on collecting the precious seafood from the sea bottom until well into old age, braving the depths by the sheer virtue of their breath. Their skin is tanned by the elements, their voice roughened, deep and loud.For centuries, 9 women from the Japanese peninsula of Shima have shared their fate on a boat and grown together to become a close-knit sea-faring family. Kazu Yamamoto, at nearly 80 years of age, is the oldest in the group, a 5th-generation 'Ama'. She has by no means thought about giving up her work yet: "In the sea I can feel and move my body better than a shore. Once in the water all pain disappears, also suddenly my back doesn't hurt anymore", Kazu Yamamoto explains.

  • 11:35

    Most Intriguing Safari Destinations (Most Intriguing Safari Destinations)

    Most Intriguing Safari Destinations (Most Intriguing Safari Destinations)

    Most Intriguing Safari Destinations

    Karina has the fortune of visiting one of the top 10 safari lodges in the world and arguably the finest game reserve on earth: SINGITA PAMUSHANA, in the Malilangwe conservation trust. Karina describes the beautiful lodge and wines and dines in style. Karina experiences mating lions. Karina's adventurous guide Craig Van Zyl leads her to a grumpy black rhino that frazzles her nerves. Craig persuades Karina to observe elephants while they enjoy themselves wallowing in the mud, and they spend a night sleeping under the stars.

  • 12:00

    Rwanda - Land of Women (Rwanda - Land of Women)

    Rwanda - Land of Women (Rwanda - Land of Women)

    Rwanda - Land of Women

    Report met the powerful women of Rwanda who played a major role in the political stability and economical developments of the country.15 years ago, Rwanda was the backdrop for one of the most horrifying crimes in the history of humanity. The country's majority ethnic group, the Hutus, pursued the minority ethnic group, the Tutsi. More than a million people were murdered during the genocide. But today, Rwanda is an example for whole Africa.No other country on the continent has a comparable success story and changed so dramatically over the past few years - and this despite such bad circumstances. Rwanda no longer is the poorest country in Africa, and has achieved political stability. These developments are attributed to the women of Rwanda.

  • 13:00

    My Dubai (My Dubai)

    My Dubai (My Dubai)

    My Dubai

    Family - Atlantis the Palm resort with its dolphins, seals and water park, desert experiences such as dune bashing, falcon flying and camel riding, indoor skiing, the world's largest shopping mall, and Kidzania.

  • 13:30

    My Dubai (My Dubai)

    My Dubai (My Dubai)

    My Dubai

    Culture - Features a recreated Bedouin camp with a Bedouin elder giving insight into their rich culture, the Sheikh Mohammed Centre for Cultural Understanding, the gold and spice souks, art of caligraphy and the Emirati style of dressing.

  • 14:00

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Seg 1 Chromatic Adaptation. Chromatic adaptation is the ability of humans to adjust to changes in brightness to keep up with the appearance of colors. this is the reason why we are able to perceive colors properly even though lighting in real environments change constantly. Seg 2 Color-changing animals. Color changing in animals are developed adaptations which the animals use for various applications such as signaling their species or as a way to hide from predators. Animals that can change color have specialized cells called chromatophores that can alter pigmentation and light reflecting properties. Seg 3 How do we see the color pink. We are able to see pink because our brains are able to perceive variations in light and color. Although pink as a wavelength does not exist in the light spectrum, it is our brains that processes light in a such a way that we are able to perceive combinations of colors thus giving us a way to see colors like pink. Seg 4 Blue wings, blue feathers. Blue rarely exists in nature. But due to evolution, structural features in the wings and feathers of some animals allow light to bend in ways that make it possible to reflect the color blue. Seg 5 Snow camouflage. Snow camouflage, is a type of camouflage that certain creatures use to hide during winter. It is typically characterised by differing shades of grays and whites.

  • 14:30

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Wonder (Wonder)

    Seg 1 Monty Hall problem. The Monty Hall Problem poses a counter-instinctive dilemma of picking a choice with a higher probability of winning. It has been calculated that switching from a player's initial choice to the last option possible, after eliminating all empty choices, instead of sticking with the initial choice gives a bigger chance of winning. Seg 2 The Birthday Problem. The Birthday Problem presents a situation that addresses brains' unintuitive response to exponents. We try to figure out why it's possible for only 23 people to have a 50% chance of sharing a birthday when there are 365 unique birthdays. The dilemma usually comes in when we gloss over the fact that even small groups can form several pairings, and we actually compute the probability of sharing a birthday by subtracting the chances of not sharing a birthday by multiplying individual probabilities with each other. The answers can be quite surprising when the math to be done is not instinctive for people. Seg 3 Gambler's ruin. Gambler's Ruin closes in on how a gambler with the smaller amount will always be the loser in the long run in a game of 50-50 chance with an indefinite number of rounds playing. Gambler's Ruin also debunks the "luck" factor by emphasizing that each round played has its separate probability from previous rounds, thus maintaining chances of winning at 50%. Seg 4 The Infinite Hotel Paradox. The Infinite Hotel Paradox shows how infinity, for all its vastness, cannot be fully grasped, especially when it goes beyond the confines of the countable infinity. The paradoxical part comes in when the union of two sets with infinite elements will still be infinity; adding, subtracting, multiplying, or dividing infinity with infinity is still infinity. Seg 5 The Locker Riddle. The Locker Riddle stimulates how good and fast a person is at factorization. In the problem, the key is identifying which numbers from 1-100 are perfect squares, but the solution lies in the number of factors those particular numbers have. Perfect squares have odd numbered factors because one factor will be multiplied by itself and it only counts as one in the riddle's context, leaving those locker numbers open in an alternating open-close pattern.

  • 15:00

    A Dog's Life (A Dog's Life)

    A Dog's Life (A Dog's Life)

    A Dog's Life explores the widely assumed facts that may actually be based on faulty and out-dated research. Ingenious experiments and meticulous observation reveal that the problems dogs solve best are those that involve interacting with humans. A fascinating and fun documentary that gives us 'a dog's eye view' on the world.

  • 15:45

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force

    Journey inside Dust Storms to see how they are formed and the hazards and effects they cause. A glimpse into the science of Clouds and how they fit into the weather cycle of the planet.\nThe power of Lightening is more than visual, it is noise, electricity and it even helps plants to grow. Did you know that Rain droplets have different shapes and temperatures, it's maybe more interesting than you think?

  • 16:15

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force (Nature's Force)

    Nature's Force

    Heatwaves have caused cities to literally meltdown and systems to fail, how are we working with nature's heat? When two Cyclones collide, we get the Fujiwhara Effect, how is this possible and how does it manifest? Floods occur around the world and the world is learning how to cope, combat and prevent damage and share lessons. How do you classify a Blizzard, and let's look at some of the worst blizzards that have occurred on earth. Do you really know how to measure Rainfall and how to identify violent rain from a shower or appreciate when we have had enough or too much?

  • 16:45

    The Science Of Magic (The Science Of Magic)

    The Science Of Magic (The Science Of Magic)

    Our film follows researchers who are bringing magicians' tricks into the laboratory. With impossible magic, amazing facts, and opportunities for viewers to participate in the magic tricks, this extraordinary exploration peeks behind the curtain into a fascinating world where ancient magic meets modern science. Magician Julie Eng not only mystifies us with magic, she also takes us to Montreal's McGill University to meet Jay Olson who is using card tricks to study consciousness. His research also includes an MRI machine that can apparently not only read minds, but also manipulate thoughts. In the US we meet with professor Anthony Barnhart. He's a magician turned scientist who is using magic principles to investigate why we sometimes don't see what's right under our noses. We also meet Professor Amory Danek who is using the conjuror's craft to study creativity and problem solving.Professor Ronald Rensink at the University of British Columbia discovered how small distractions can blind drivers to obvious dangers. These studies naturally led him to work with magicians to explore possible new experiments.In London England Gustav Kuhn conducts a study that tracks the eye movements of the magician's audience. We see tricks that fool us despite nothing actually happening, as well as demonstrations that reveal we can be blind even to our own choices. Colourful and compelling, our film takes a critical and engaging look at the fascinating facts revealed when you see the human mind through the eyes of a magician.

  • 17:35

    The Monkey Whisperer And His Dream (The Monkey Whisperer And His Dream)

    The Monkey Whisperer And His Dream (The Monkey Whisperer And His Dream)

    360° GEO - Report accompanies David van Gennep a committed animal rights activist and his team of volunteers during on a distinctly moving mission. There is great excitement in the back of the monkey transporter - after a 20-minute drive, 8 chimpanzees impatient to get out of the van, suddenly go silent. For here, there is suddenly no cold concrete floor, and no cage awaiting them, but a vast, natural expanse of trees, grass and blue skies. After years of imprisonment, maltreatment and isolation, they will now have to learn to liaise with conspecifics, build up families and live outdoors. "Monkey whisperer" David van Gennep wipes the tears from his eyes. His lifelong dream to found a paradise for maltreated monkeys in Alicante in Spain, is finally coming true.

  • 18:30

    Guano the Island Of Agony (Guano the Island Of Agony)

    Guano the Island Of Agony (Guano the Island Of Agony)

    Guano the Island Of Agony

    Millions of sea birds nest on the Peruvian coastline. Their excrement - guano - is highly valuable, and is exported as fertilizer all over the world. Guano farming is done manually, in the same way it was done during the period of the Incas. Only the strongest of men can endure the harsh work, as well as the long months of isolation on the uninhabited islands. The stench of the excrement is difficult to bear, and the acidic dust burns the lungs. 360° - GEO followed the workers who collect the guano. A documentary on the islands of suffering.

  • 19:25

    The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter (The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter)

    The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter (The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter)

    The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter

    On the North-Western tip of Greenland, fathers give their boys small dog sledges as soon as they can walk. The toy is meant to teach them hunting, a survival skill for Polar Inuits. Increasingly fewer boys, however, want to become hunters. 12-year-old Qaaqqukannguaq is an exception. During the spring holidays, he is going to accompany his father on a hunting trip for the first time. For several days, they will cross the ice desert on dog sledges, covering the 70 km from Savissivik, their tiny community, to Cape York.

  • 20:20

    Fine Cocoa From Esmeralda (Fine Cocoa From Esmeralda)

    Fine Cocoa From Esmeralda (Fine Cocoa From Esmeralda)

    Cacao Nacional from Ecuador is also known as "Theobroma Cacao" or "food of the gods". The pods grow in the remotest regions of the country, including in small villages along the Rio Santiago and the Rio Napo. Theobroma's distinctive flavor is valued by chocolatiers around the world. The high demand helps cocoa farmers like Lilian and Cleofe develop a new, long-term and more reliable means of subsistence. Cocoa plantations also immensely benefit the environment: cocoa trees grow in mixed species plantations and thereby protect the rainforest. They represent an alternative to palm tree plantations that are highly destructive to the local environment.

  • 21:15

    Colonies Under the Sea (Colonies Under the Sea)

    Colonies Under the Sea (Colonies Under the Sea)

    The film follows four unique divers as they explore shipwrecks in the heart of the Bahamas archipelago in order to discover the unexpected life they harbor.

  • 22:00

    Grosslockner King Of the High Alps (Grosslockner King Of the High Alps)

    Grosslockner King Of the High Alps (Grosslockner King Of the High Alps)

    Grosslockner King Of the High Alps

    The report accompanies Austrian farmers in the highest mountain of the country - the Glossglockner - from July until Christmas, throughout the changing seasons. It is mid-June and summer is finding its way into the valleys of East Tyrol, even though the Hohe Tauern Mountains are still covered with snow. In the distance, the Grossglockner gleams bright white above the Tyrol mountain village of Kals. This summer, mountain climbers from all over the world will scale the Grossglockner. Toni Riepler, a mountain guide from Kals and his wife Gitti have a lot of work to do. They run the "Glorerhütte", one of the oldest mountain huts in the area. For 3 months, from mid-June to mid-September, the family lives high up in the Alps. In the winter, they stay down in the valley.

  • 23:00

    Galicia's Death Cost (Galicia's Death Cost)

    Galicia's Death Cost (Galicia's Death Cost)

    360°GEO - Report accompanies goose barnacle fishermen on a trip to the deadly cliffs. But even there, the goose barnacle population is declining rapidly.Their working district is the "Costa del Morte" - the "Coast of Death", where the oil tanker "Prestige" split apart in 2002. Here, the waves of the Atlantic are often lashed against the rocks by northwest gale force 8 winds.Their working district is the "Costa del Morte" - the "Coast of Death", where the oil tanker "Prestige" split apart in 2002. Here, the waves of the Atlantic are often lashed against the rocks by northwest gale force 8 winds.

  • 23:55

    Andalusia: The Moorish Architecture (Andalusia: The Moorish Architecture)

    Andalusia: The Moorish Architecture (Andalusia: The Moorish Architecture)

    Andalusia: The Moorish Architecture

    Andalusia, the Spanish territory has a confluence of cultures which is represented in its architecture! Visigothic, Roman, Byzantine and Arab - the structures in the region display all these influences. Between 8th & 15th century, several dynasties from Arab to Berber conquered Andalusia impacting the way of life of people. The film tells this story through beautiful edifices of Andalusia.

  • 07:00

    Man Eaters (Man Eaters)

    Man Eaters (Man Eaters)

    Man Eaters

    The first documentary about the Human-leopard conflict in Sri Lanka, "Man Eaters: A Human Leopard Story" approaches the conflict by analyzing past and present cases of man-eating leopards in Sri Lanka and what led to their strange behavior. Unlike India, man-eating leopards in Sri Lanka are very rare.

Šobrīd rāda

Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration(Zenith - Advances In Space Exploration)
00:25 - 01:00

Zenith – Advances in Space Exploration reveals these latest developments and the implications they hold for all of us.